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Get Your Pet on the Road to Recovery

Pets are family and they deserve the best veterinary care available. From wellness exams and vaccines to advanced diagnostic services and complex surgical procedures, your pets will receive top-quality care at our hospitals.

Wellness exams are an integral part of preventive medicine. The goal of preventive medicine is to diagnose and treat health problems before they can become serious. Due to the advances in veterinary medicine, many diseases that were once devastating to a pet’s health are now treatable. Diseases that are found and treated early can often be resolved or managed so that your pets can live happy, healthy lives.

In the most general terms, dogs and cats should be seen for a wellness exam at least once a year and at least twice yearly if your pet is considered a “senior” pet, ages 7 and older. Your veterinarian may recommend more frequent wellness exams based on your pet’s age, breed, health, activity and existing illnesses.

Puppies and kittens often need a series of vaccinations when they are young to help them obtain resistance from diseases. Most puppies and kittens will visit the veterinarian several times early in life for these vaccines. When you bring your puppy or kitten in for wellness visits, it is also a good time to talk about spaying and/or neutering your pet. In addition, microchipping your pet while it is here for spay/neuter surgery helps eliminate discomfort or additional stress for your pet.

A wellness exam allows your veterinarian to assess your pet’s health and to become aware of any issues that may exist. A comprehensive examination will include a check of all body systems. Vaccines will be given if they are due and if age and health status make this an appropriate time, and a fecal and heartworm analysis may be performed. Your veterinarian may also want to perform diagnostic tests to best evaluate your pet’s health.

The American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) has issued vaccine guidelines to assist veterinarians in making the best vaccine choice for your pet. Vaccinations are not only safe and effective, they are an important and fundamental piece of your pet’s preventative healthcare plan. Advances in veterinary immunology have made diseases that once were relatively common and fatal to pets easily preventable.

Additionally, with each passing year, veterinary science is improving on existent vaccines as well as increasing our ability to prevent an even wider array of contagious diseases.

Charts:

  • Puppy vaccines
  • Kitten vaccines
  • Dog vaccines
  • Cat vaccines

Why Vaccinate?

The American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) has issued vaccine guidelines to assist veterinarians in making the best vaccine choices for your pet. Vaccinations are not only safe and effective, they are an important and fundamental piece of your pet’s preventative healthcare plan. Advances in veterinary immunology have made diseases that once were relatively common and fatal to pets easily preventable.

Additionally, with each passing year, veterinary science is improving on existent vaccines as well as increasing our ability to prevent an even wider array of contagious diseases.

 

Healthy Pets of Ohioutilizes a traditional vaccination protocol, recommending that healthy animals receive the following:

Adult Dogs
Annual/Triennial Vaccination Recommendations

Rabies: Offered in a one-year or three-year vaccine option. All dogs and cats in Delaware and Franklin counties are required to be vaccinated against rabies and are required to wear their rabies tag. Most counties in Ohio have a rabies vaccination law. Please check with your county for more information.

Distemper Combination: This combination vaccine protects against canine distemper, canine adenovirus-2 infection (hepatitis and respiratory disease), canine parvovirus infection, parainfluenza and leptospirosis. The abbreviation for this vaccine is frequently written as “DA2PL”.

Bordetella: Though not considered a core vaccine, Bordetella vaccine may be recommended for dogs whose lifestyle places them at greater risk of contracting the disease. This includes dogs that are boarded frequently or that regularly visit the groomer or dog parks regularly.

Adult Cats
Annual/Triennial Vaccination Recommendations

Rabies: For adults receiving an initial rabies vaccine, one dose is considered protective. For all cats, a second dose one year after the initial vaccine is recommended. Following that, the vaccine should be administered every one to three years, depending on the product’s labeling.

Feline Leukemia: One of the most dangerous infectious diseases in cats today is caused by feline leukemia virus (FeLV). Cats at risk for developing feline leukemia include outdoor cats, cats living in multiple cat households and cats that interact frequently with other cats. For these high-risk cats, vaccinating for feline leukemia may be beneficial.

Puppies

Puppies should receive a series of vaccines beginning at six to eight weeks of age and every three to four weeks until 16 to 20 weeks of age. After one year, annual vaccination is recommended.

Rabies: All puppies should have a one-year Rabies vaccination at approximately 16 weeks of age. All dogs and cats in Delaware and Franklin counties are required to be vaccinated against rabies and are required to wear their rabies tag. Most counties in Ohio have a rabies vaccination law. Please check with your county for more information.

Distemper Combination: This combination vaccine protects against canine distemper, canine adenovirus-2 infection (hepatitis and respiratory disease), canine parvovirus infection, parainfluenza, and leptospirosis. The abbreviation for this vaccine is frequently written as “DA2PL”. Almost all researchers agree that for puppies, we need to give at least three combination vaccinations starting between 6-8 weeks of age and repeat these at 3-4 week intervals.

Bordetella: Though not considered a core vaccine, Bordetella vaccine may be recommended for puppies whose lifestyle places them at greater risk of contracting the disease. This includes puppies that attend puppy classes, visit pet supply stores, are boarded frequently or that regularly visit groomers or dog parks.

Kittens

Kittens should be vaccinated beginning at six to eight weeks of age and every three to four weeks until 16 to 20 weeks of age. After one year, annual vaccination is recommended.

Rabies: Kittens are generally vaccinated against rabies when they are around 16 weeks of age and given a booster shot a year after the initial vaccination. Following that, the vaccine should be administered every one to three years, depending on the product’s labeling.

Distemper Combo (RCP): The panleukopenia virus (FPV), feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1), and feline calicivirus (FCV) vaccines are typically administered as a combination vaccine and is often referred to as RCP. The initial vaccine is usually given around six to eight weeks of age followed by two booster vaccines each given about three to four weeks apart.

Feline Leukemia: For kittens, the first dose of vaccine is recommended at eight to 10 weeks of age, a booster is given three to four weeks later, and a final booster one year later.

Vaccines are biological products made to trigger a protective immune response. A vaccine stimulates the immune system to recognize the disease agent as “foreign”, destroy the agent, and then remember the agent if it is encountered in the future.

Vaccines may lessen the severity of a disease process or prevent the disease altogether. No vaccine is 100% effective in preventing disease as there are many factors involved such as timing of vaccination, inadequate response to the vaccination, and health at the time of vaccination.

There are some risks involved with vaccinations but these need to be weighed against the vast benefits of proper vaccination. Most cats and dogs respond well to vaccinations. The most common adverse responses are mild and of short duration (24 – 48 hours) and may include slight fever, lethargy (sluggishness), or reduced appetite. There are other more serious reactions that occur rarely such as vomiting/diarrhea, swelling, or a severe allergic reaction. Always let your veterinarian know of any abnormalities you notice after your pet has been vaccinated.

There are many available vaccines and not all pets should be vaccinated with all of them. Your veterinarian will consider your pet’s risk of exposure based on many factors such as your geographic location, travel plans, and contact with other animals. The frequency of vaccinations is also based on individual factors. Your veterinarian will tailor a vaccination program that is best for your pet.

Kittens and puppies require a series of vaccinations (similar to children) due to their developing immune system. An incomplete series of vaccinations may lead to inadequate protection so it is critical to complete the entire regimen.

In many communities, including Franklin County, rabies vaccination is required by law for all cats and dogs over the age of 4 months. Rabies is a serious, often fatal, disease that can spread from infected animals to people. Vaccinating your pets against rabies also helps to protect your family and may save your pet’s life if they bite someone—unvaccinated animals may have to be euthanized to test for rabies if they bite someone.

In summary, vaccinations are part of a total wellness plan for your pet and your veterinarian can determine the best schedule based on your pet’s risk and lifestyle.

Our doctors and staff know the importance of your pet’s oral health and the role it can play in the complete health of your pet. Through ultrasonic scaling, plaque and tartar can be removed to keep teeth healthy and therefore pain free. With the help of dental radiographs, we can assess bone disease and prevent unnecessary extraction of teeth.

From simple cleaning to surgical procedures, regular dental care is important for maintaining your pet’s teeth and health. Decay and damage to the teeth and gums allows bacteria and disease to enter an animal’s system, causing serious problems for your pet.

We use modern and safe equipment and techniques to clean each tooth thoroughly, above and below the gum line. Our dental technicians polish teeth to create a smooth, lustrous tooth surface, one that is more resistant to plaque build-up. Fluoride treatments help strengthen enamel and reduce tooth sensitivity. We also provide advanced dental care when needed and advanced dental surgical procedures.

Healthy Pets of Ohio embraces the AAHA Dental Care Guidelines, which recommend regular oral examinations and dental cleanings for all adult dogs and cats. AAHA recommends these procedures at least annually starting at one year of age for cats and small-breed dogs, and at two years of age for large-breed dogs.

AAHA recommends that veterinarians evaluate puppies and kittens for problems related to deciduous (baby) teeth, missing teeth, extra teeth, swelling and oral development. As pets age, your veterinarian will examine your pet for developmental anomalies, accumulation of plaque and tartar, periodontal disease and oral tumors. The veterinarian can perform a basic oral examination while pets are awake. However, short-lasting anesthetic is required for a more complete examination.

Other AAHA Guideline Recommendations

Pre-anesthetic exam – Whenever anesthesia is needed, special considerations are taken to help ensure the safety of your pet. Healthy Pets of Ohio veterinarians thoroughly examine your pet to make sure the animal is healthy enough to undergo anesthesia. We may run blood, urine, electrocardiograph and X-ray tests to check for any dangerous heart, kidney or other conditions. Though there is some risk associated with any medical procedure, modern anesthesia is usually safe, even for older pets.

Anesthesia monitoring – When your pet is under anesthesia, its vital signs (such as body temperature, heart rate and respiration) should be monitored and recorded. This helps ensure your pet’s safety while under anesthesia.

Dental radiographs – X-rays of your pet’s teeth are needed periodically to evaluate your pet’s oral health. X-rays also help detect abnormalities that cannot be seen through physical examination alone. They can also confirm the need for tooth extraction when teeth are loose or badly infected.

Scaling and polishing – Using instruments much like human dentists do, veterinarians remove plaque and calculus from your pet’s teeth. Polishing with a special paste to smooth-out scratches to the tooth’s enamel.

Fluoride/sealants – By applying an anti-plaque substance, such as a fluoride treatment and/or a barrier sealant, the veterinarian helps strengthen and desensitize teeth to discourage the development of future plaque.

Home Dental Care

Pet owners also play an important role in their animals’ oral health. Regular teeth brushing at home coupled with regular dental check-ups can help your pet live a longer, healthier life.

Veterinary surgery can be considered minor (a few stitches) or major (an orthopedic procedure). In order to provide your pet with advanced, safe and comprehensive surgical care, our hospitals are equipped with a state-of-the-art surgery suite, highly sophisticated anesthesia machines and the latest in patient-monitoring devices.

All patients are assessed the day of surgery and anesthetics are chosen based on your pet’s specific needs. Our fully-trained staff monitors each patient at all times, ensuring the maximal safety possible throughout the procedure and post operatively. Our surgeons are gloved, masked and fully gowned, using sterilized instruments for all surgical procedures to minimize post-operative infection rates. From routine procedures, such as spays and neuters, to more complex orthopedic, soft-tissue and emergency surgeries, Dr. Taylor and the veterinarians at Healthy Pets of Ohio have decades of surgical experience and are ready to treat your pet if the need arises.

Pain management is an important part of our pre-operative, intra-operative and post-operative anesthetic and medical protocols. All surgical patients, including those undergoing routine procedures, receive pain control medication. During surgery, as well as during the recovery period, your pet is continuously monitored with a variety of devices, including pulse oximeter and ECG. In addition, an intravenous (IV) catheter is used to deliver fluids to your pet during surgery and during his or her recovery.

Laser Surgery

Healthy Pets of Ohiois pleased to offer surgical laser options for many procedures including spays and neuters. In many procedures, the laser can replace the scalpel and provide a better alternative to traditional surgery.

Surgery performed with a laser can provide:

  • Less Pain – laser energy seals nerve endings as it moves through tissue. Your pet feels less pain post-operatively.
  • Less Bleeding – the laser seals small blood vessels during surgery, which allows the surgeon to perform surgeries with extraordinary precision. This also speeds some procedures and reduces the need for anesthesia.
  • Less Swelling – laser energy does not crush, tear or bruise because only a beam of intense light contacts the tissue.

Benefits of laser surgery:

  • Reduced risk of infection – the laser sterilizes as it removes diseased tissue, killing bacteria that causes infection.
  • Quicker return to normal activities – recovery is rapid and there is less post-operative discomfort.

Overall, the laser can reduce trauma to your pet, improve healing and may shorten time spent in the veterinary hospital. Ask your veterinary surgeon about the option of laser surgery for your pet.

Emergency Surgery and Critical Care

When every second counts, our experienced staff and our state-of-the-art equipment are here to provide immediate attention to your pet in case of an emergency. We offer this service during our regular business hours as well as evenings, weekends and holidays. A Healthy Pets of Ohio veterinarian is on call 24/7 to fulfill your emergency needs.

Laboratory Testing
We have the capacity to do many laboratory tests in-house such as Complete Blood Counts (CBC), general blood chemistries to check organ function, and electrolyte monitoring so that we have access to immediate results, often during your appointment. These allow us to quickly diagnose and monitor your pet’s health. Our trained technicians and doctors also perform fecal floatation’s, ELSIA heartworm tests, and in-house urinalysis. Powerful microscopes allow us to perform cytology on cells from masses or wounds as well as monitor bacteria from skin and ears to guide our treatment plan. We also partner with a large national laboratory that gives us the capacity to do precision testing on hundreds of health conditions.

Digital Radiology
Radiographs (X-rays) are performed in-house to help aid in prompt diagnosis and evaluation of a variety of conditions. All of our hospitals have an on-site X-ray machine to aid us in evaluating gastrointestinal, cardiopulmonary, urinary, reproductive and musculoskeletal conditions. Our Wedgewood, Westgate and Rome Hilliard hospitals offer digital X-rays that can immediately transfer images for consultations with board-certified veterinary radiologists.

Ultrasonography
Our hospitals are equipped with ultrasound machines so that your pet’s doctor can evaluate soft tissue, organs and cardiac examinations through non-invasive technology. Several of our doctors have undergone formal ultrasound training so they can monitor and diagnose conditions in a timely manner. Ultrasound is an important tool in monitoring cardiac disease, evaluating individual abdominal organs, monitoring pregnancy, and giving us the ability to evaluate the bladder for stones or abnormalities. There are several conditions in which use of the ultrasound can allow us to do biopsies and monitor internal organs without the need for exploratory surgery. Expert review and consultation of ultrasounds by a board-certified radiologist is possible though our partnership with members of this specialty.

Endoscopy
Fiber optics allow direct visual examination of your pet’s oral and nasal cavities, esophagus, stomach, small intestines and colon by use of an endoscope. This can aid in obtaining biopsy samples and evaluating tissue. It can also be used to extract small objects (foreign bodies) from the esophagus and stomach without the need to explore the abdominal cavity surgically.

Tonometry
Each hospital is equipped with a device that can measure to pressure in an animal’s eyes to screen for glaucoma or uveitis-related issues.

Pharmacy
Our in-house pharmacy is well-stocked with the most widely used prescription medications for your pet. We also stock preventative medications for fleas, ticks, parasites and heartworms. Healthy Pets of Ohio also carries a full line of veterinary prescription diets.

Dentistry
Our doctors and staff know the importance of your pet’s oral health and the role it can play in the complete health of your pet. Through ultrasonic scaling, plaque and tartar can be removed to keep teeth healthy and pain free. With the help of dental radiographs, we can assess bone disease and prevent unnecessary extraction of teeth.

Surgery
Veterinary surgery can be considered minor (a few stitches) or major (an orthopedic procedure). In order to provide your pet with advanced, safe and comprehensive surgical care, our hospitals are equipped with a state-of-the-art surgery suite, highly sophisticated anesthesia machines and the latest in patient monitoring devices. All patients are assessed the day of surgery and anesthetics are chosen based on your pet’s specific needs. Our fully-trained staff monitors each patient at all times, ensuring the maximal safety possible throughout the procedure and post operatively.

Our surgeons are gloved, masked and fully gowned, using sterilized instruments for all surgical procedures to minimize post-operative infection rates. From routine procedures such as spays and neuters, to more complex orthopedic, soft-tissue and emergency surgeries, Dr. Taylor and the veterinarians at Healthy Pets of Ohio have decades of surgical experience and are ready to treat your pet if the need arises.

Pain management is an important part of our pre-operative, intra-operative and post-operative anesthetic and medical protocols. All surgical patients, including those undergoing routine procedures, receive pain control medication. During surgery, as well as during the recovery period, your pet is continuously monitored with a variety of devices, including pulse oximeter and ECG. In addition, an intravenous (IV) catheter is used to deliver fluids to your pet during surgery and during his or her recovery.

Emergency Surgery and Critical Care
When every second counts, our experienced staff and our state-of-the-art equipment are here to provide immediate attention to your pet in case of an emergency. We offer this service during our regular business hours as well as evenings, weekends and holidays. AHealthy Pets of Ohio veterinarian is on call 24/7 to fulfill your emergency needs.

Healthy Pets of Ohio is one of the few veterinary hospitals to offer specialty care in physical rehabilitation. Central Ohio K9 Rehabilitation, located in our Healthy Pets of OhioWedgewood facility, is directed by Dr. Adriane Huffman Ventresca, a certified canine rehabilitation practitioner.

The team at Central Ohio K9 Rehabilitation is dedicated to helping you and your dog overcome and manage conditions that may limit quality of life. They understand the passion and joy that comes from having dogs and wanting to do the most you can for them so that they can live long and healthy lives. They also understand the frustration you feel when they are not physically well, recovering from surgery or are struggling to lose weight.

Physical therapy for canines, or canine rehabilitation, adapts human physical therapy techniques to increase function and mobility of joints and muscles in animals. Animal rehabilitation can reduce pain and enhance recovery from injury, surgery, degenerative diseases, age-related diseases and obesity. The goal of physical therapy for animals is to improve quality of life and decrease pain.

Rehabilitation therapy (i.e., the application of physical therapy techniques to animals) may be used to return a patient to normal function following surgery or trauma or as a part of a long-term strategy to manage pain. Rehabilitation includes techniques such as cryotherapy, heat therapy, massage, stretching, passive range-of-motion exercise, hydrotherapy, therapeutic exercise, use of dry land or underwater treadmill, and strength-building.

Central Ohio K9 Rehabilitation offers hydrotherapy, low level laser treatment, pain management, fitness conditioning and nutritional guidance to help your pets get the most out of life.

Low Level Laser Therapy
Low level laser therapy (LLLT) is a great addition to rehabilitation therapies for animals. Low level laser therapy goes by several other names, including cold therapy and soft laser therapy (as opposed to hard lasers used in surgical procedures). Whatever name is used to describe the laser, the goal is the same – to heal.

Low level laser therapy is a non-invasive tool that provides a means of controlling pain and accelerating healing with no adverse side effects. LLLT is used to increase the speed, quality and tensile strength of tissue repair, resolve inflammation, and give pain relief. It is an attractive form of treatment for animal athletes, due to the prospect of shorter recovery and lay-off times.

Here are some of the conditions that LLLT can help treat:

  • Muscle, ligament and tendon damage.
  • Traumatic or post-surgical wounds.
  • Pain and inflammation due to joint disease (including arthritis, hip dysplasia, patella luxation and others).
  • Neurologic conditions.
  • Recovery from surgical repair of bone/joint injuries.

It is never easy to see our beloved pets’ quality of life decline. Healthy Pets of Ohio offers hospice and palliative care to help ease your pet’s discomfort. Whether that means providing medication to help ease pain or peaceful at-home euthanasia, we take the time to make sure that your pet and family are comfortable and supported with end-of-life care.

Palliative Care
Palliative care is defined as “the active total care of patients whose disease is not responsive to curative treatment. Control of pain is paramount. The goal of palliative care is achievement of the best quality of life for patients and their families.” Palliative care maximizes the pet’s quality of life while managing pain and discomfort. Providing palliative care treats the patient but not necessarily the disease. Examples of palliative care include appropriate analgesics and other pharmacologic agents, and nutritional support.

Hospice Care
With advancements in medicine and early disease detection, pets are living longer than ever before. Hospice is an area of practice devoted to pain management and emotional support for pets and their families as they face the pet’s final journey together.

Your pet is part of your family. It is this strong bond you have with your pet that motivated us to offer personalized hospice care as your pet’s life draws to a close. The process of losing a furry best friend can be devastating. You may not know your options for pain management or may not believe in euthanasia. Our team is dedicated to educating you about your options and designing a plan that maximizes your pet’s quality time. This time will also allow you to adjust and say goodbye.

We are here to help you through this difficult time by providing emotional support and education. You will also have peace of mind that your pet’s final days are quality ones. When the time comes to say goodbye, we will be there to support you in making tough decisions.

Our palliative and hospice care programs offer in hospital options to help make the last phase of your pet’s life full of love with minimal physical discomfort. Our team uses phone conferencing and medical treatment in our state-of-the-art facilities to provide:

  • Physical exams.
  • Nutrition counseling.
  • Comprehensive pain and quality of life management.
  • Chemotherapy and chemotherapy monitoring.
  • Constant review and monitoring of pain medication effectiveness and your pet’s treatment plan.
  • Private comfort rooms at our facility.
  • Referrals to support groups, grief counseling and pet memorialization services.

Boarding
All of our Healthy Pets of Ohio hospitals offer dog and cat boarding. Our boarding facilities include large, air-conditioned dog kennels to accommodate your pets while you are out of town. We also have a quiet cattery for our feline friends. Our Wedgewood and Lewis Center locations offer large luxury suites with all glass fronts and abundant natural light. Each hospital varies in layout and accommodations, so please call your hospital for details on boarding services.

One of the most important things to consider when you are looking for boarding is personnel. All Healthy Pets of Ohio hospitals offer veterinary-supervised boarding, which means trained professionals are monitoring your dog or cat on a daily basis. You can rest easy knowing that your furry friends are in the best possible hands.

Pets are required to be up-to-date on vaccines before boarding. Dogs must be current on rabies, distemper, leptospirosis and bordetella vaccinations. Cats must be current on rabies, RCP and feline leukemia.
We would be happy to offer you a personal tour of our boarding facilities at any time. It is important to us that you and your pet be comfortable during their stay.

We recommend bringing the following items to make your dog or cat boarding stay with us as enjoyable as possible:

  • Food – When boarding your dog or cat, we recommend that you bring the food your pet is used to eating so that his/her diet is not upset while boarding with us. We feed based on your instructions and handle all special need pets such as refrigerated foods, micro-waved meals or mixing foods. Please inform us of the dietary requirements and we will ensure they are met.
  • Bedding/Blanket/Toys – Having an item from home can help your dog or cat feel more relaxed while they are boarding with us.
  • Medication – We are able to administer all medication as needed on any schedule.

Grooming
Our professional groomers offer years of grooming experience to you and your pet. They know exactly how to pamper your pet. They pride themselves in gentle, no-stress grooming of all breeds of dogs, cats and small animals. Their gentle touch and expert knowledge will put even the most nervous pets at ease.

Grooming can help pets avoid unhealthy matted coats, which can hide all kinds of skin conditions and may keep a problem from being noticed. A dull or balding coat may be a sign of specific medical conditions – regular coat inspections via a professional groomer may help you notice if there is a change in your pet’s coat.

We offer breed standard cuts and those based on personal preference. We would be happy to help keep your pets looking their best. Please contact your Healthy Pets of Ohio location to make an appointment.

A pet microchip creates a forever bond between you and the pet you love. Healthy Pets of Ohio works hand-in-hand with HomeAgain® pet recovery system to give your pet the best chance of coming back home.

Dog and cat microchipping is a simple procedure. A veterinarian simply injects a microchip for pets, about the size of a grain of rice (12mm), beneath the surface of your pet’s skin between the shoulder blades. The process is similar to a routine shot, takes only a few seconds and your pet will not react any more than he would to a vaccination. No anesthetic is required.

A HomeAgain® microchip is permanent pet ID. The microchip itself has no internal energy source, so it will last the life of your pet. It is read by passing a microchip scanner over the pet’s shoulder blades. The scanner emits a low radio frequency that provides the power necessary to transmit the microchips unique cat or dog ID code and positively identify the pet.

HomeAgain® is the only dog and cat microchipping product on the market today that has the Bio-Bond patented anti-migration feature to help ensure that the microchip will stay in place so that it may be easily located and scanned. If your pet gets lost and is taken to an animal shelter or veterinarian, they will scan the microchip to read its unique dog or cat ID code. This is the number used by HomeAgain® to identify the pet and retrieve your contact information, which is used to contact you and reunite you with your pet.